What is GURU bike fitting and what does it involve?

What is GURU bike fitting and what does it involve?

Bike fit is an incredibly important aspect of cycling. A poorly adjusted bike can lead to injuries and inefficiency, so having your bike set up for you is paramount. In recent years cycling has become increasingly popular, and you can now see cyclists, either in groups or on their own taking over British roads – you’ll no doubt be riding alongside them. With this drastic increase in the number of people taking up cycling, bike fit has never been more important, since this new popularity means that more and more cyclists are hitting the road without much knowledge of the sport. What does GURU bike fitting involve? Any bike fit involves a lot of small adjustments to your bike which aim to make your riding experience as comfortable and efficient as possible. Possible adjustments include the height of the saddle, height of the handlebars, how far forward the saddle is, and alignment of your cleats. GURU have created a way of finding out your perfect bike set up to ensure you have the perfect ride. The GURU system allows for adjustments to be made instantly because the rider is actively involved in the process. This means that, instead of being prescribed a ‘best position, based on a bell curve of average angles, changes are made on the fly with instant feedback. It’s this that makes the GURU system stand out from other bike fit systems. The vertical and horizontal positioning of the bars and saddle can both be changed remotely whilst the rider is still pedalling, and this means that the GURU machine, although very smart, is only effective...
The bucking bronco achieves fame

The bucking bronco achieves fame

Still not sure what that bucking bronco in the shop is actually for? Well, while we’re not ones to blow our own trumpets here at Ten-Point (Okay, okay, Brian is excluded from that statement…) we are very happy when someone else does a little trumpet blowing on our behalf! Just a few weeks ago Helen went to carry out a bike fit. She was filmed doing so and also interviewed….by Bikeradar! And they’ve put a little story online talking about the GURU Dynamic Fit Unit and the process they went through. It really is worth a watch if you’re even remotely interested in finding a comfortable position on a bike. You can find the article and video right here!...
Weight, it’s a heavy issue – Part 2

Weight, it’s a heavy issue – Part 2

In Part 1 we talked about the weight of bikes and the potential weaknesses that may exist in super-light carbon fibre race frames. Here we’ll look at where weight can be saved on a bike. If you do really want a light bike though, is a super-light frame the best option when we add in the considerations of strength and durability? Even if your goal is a bike very near the UCI limit of 6.8Kg, provided you’re not at the top end of the size scale riding a 61cm or XL frame, that should be easily achievable. Take this Time Skylon Aktiv (in the picture above). Time will never build the lightest bikes around because of their method of construction. It’s incredibly strong and durable consisting of bespoke woven carbon fibre tubes. It rides like a dream but does sacrifice a couple of hundred grams over the lightest frames out there. This is an XL frame. It’s their aero model, so everything is stacked against making it light. And yet fully built it’s 7.21kg with 55mm deep section aero wheels, standard chromoly Speedplay pedals (with longer spindles) and bottle cages. It’s hardly a porker. So how is it so light, even for a 6’4” Clydesdale like me? Well, the light-weight has been created by components rather than frame. Yes, components do make that much of a difference! Compare this to a ride buddy with a Canyon Ultimate CF SLX in XS size – the complete opposite end of the size spectrum. It’s also the lightest bike Canyon make, coming in at a claimed 790g frame weight. Everyone that has...
Weight, it’s a heavy issue – Part 1

Weight, it’s a heavy issue – Part 1

Bikes these days are getting lighter. The UCI limit for a ‘race’ bike may still be 6.8kg but it’s not difficult to build a bike lighter than that (and indeed that UCI limit may well reduce in the not too distant future), especially if you’re riding a bike that’s not at the top end of the size range. In fact, there have been bikes floating around the web more than 1kg lighter than that lower limit. But what are they sacrificing to get there and is a light frame the best starting point for a new build? While groupsets and wheels continue to reduce in weight, it’s frames where we’ve seen the biggest ‘gains’ in weight loss. It used to be that a sub-1kg frame was light, now we’re regularly seeing frames coming in below 900g and several even below 800g. It’s being driven by improved carbon fibre knowledge and usage, better manufacturing processes and market forces that say lighter is better. If you think back to the days of steel, manufacturers found it easy to market the differences in their frames with how they were made and the lug-work and so on. But then carbon came along and it became all about the weight. You might think this only applies to super-bikes, but it’s not. Even a Cannondale SuperSix Evo with Shimano 105 groupset features a 950g frame. And that’s a £1500 bike. If you’re willing to pay a bit more, then that SuperSix range tops out with the Evo Nano framset with a price of £3699 and a sub-700g frame weight. You’d think the likes of Storck...
What makes a great bike fitter? With Dan Empfield

What makes a great bike fitter? With Dan Empfield

Here’s the first in a series of short videos we shot with Dan Empfield while he was over at Ten-Point teaching the first of many F.I.S.T. bike fitting workshops. In this video, we ask Dan, “What makes a great bike fitter?” As ever with Dan, his answer my surprise you… Question time with the bike fitting Guru – Dan Empfield at Ten-Point in Buckinghamshire from Ten-Point on...
The confusing world of bike sizing

The confusing world of bike sizing

When you go to buy a bike, you could be forgiven for thinking that bike manufacturers all size their bikes in a similar way and that as the size goes up, so the bike gets larger. Sadly, this couldn’t be further from the truth for many manufacturers. Historically, bikes were sized a bit like clothing – Small, Medium, Large and so on. Some folks  actually gave (and in fact still do give) the sizes numbers, but exactly what that number correlates to can vary – some makers use the height of the bike, others use the length. It is, in simple terms, a bit of a mess. Dan Empfield, the father of the F.I.S.T. protocol of bike fitting, proposed a method of bike sizing based around Stack and Reach. Start by thinking of a bike and now overlay a rectangle on top of it. Place the bottom left corner of that rectangle at the bottom bracket (that’s the bit the pedals rotate around). You should now be visualising something a bit like this (see left): Point 1 is our starting point. The Stack of a frame is the distance from point 1 to point 2 while the Reach of the frame is the distance from point 2 to point 3, where point 3 is the centre of the headtube. Since both the height of the bike and the length of the bike are important in finding a frame that fits you, this makes a far better method of sizing a bike than simply an arbitrary figure for either the height of the seat tube or the length of the...